New Jersey Devils News & Clips: Dec. 10

1. SUMMARY
2. LOCAL PRINT/WEB
3. TV/VIDEO LINKS
4. RADIO LINKS
5. NATIONAL PRINT/WEB

1) SUMMARY

The Devils fell to the Ducks, 6-5, in a shootout, in their first head-to-head contest of the 2018-19 campaign. The Devils will face-off with the Ducks in their final matchup of the season on January 19th at Prudential Center.

New Jersey will face-off against the San Jose Sharks tonight at SAP Center (10:30 pm, SN, NBCSCA, MSG+). Tonight’s game is the second and final contest between New Jersey and San Jose, and the second game of the Devils fifth of 14 sets back-to-back contests. New Jersey is 0-2-2 in second games so far. The Devils are 4-2-3 against Western Conference teams this season.

Abbey Mastracco, The Record, spoke to Devils head coach John Hynes about how he has seen improvement in goaltender Cory Schneider’s game.

“The fact that we put three in our net was a little bit of a different situation for sure,” Hynes said. “He got the start tonight and he made some strong saves. That’s what you’re looking for. I think you can see his game coming.”

“He’s a true pro,” Hynes said. “He continues to work at it and maintain the right attitude and you can see his game is coming around. It was just unfortunate tonight that there were some odd bounces that didn’t help him.”

Chris Ryan, NJ.com, spoke to Schneider about his performance in last night’s game.

“I mean, that first period was a little helter-skelter. I think both sides, (played) a little looser,” he said. “Not as many saves as we wanted, but you come out of it 3-3 and it is basically a 0-0 hockey game. You just have that mentality of starting over and I thought we did a good job in the second. I thought we took control of the game there and got the go ahead goal, and they [Ducks] made a push in the third.”

Amanda Stein, newjerseydevils.com, wrote her 10 takeaways following the Devils 6-5 shootout loss to the Anaheim Ducks last night.

Mike Morreale, NHL.com, spoke to Devils center Brian Boyle about what he has seen from rookie Brett Seney since he got the call up to play in the NHL.

“He wants to not only be here, but stay here,” Devils forward Brian Boyle said. “He’s a mature kid, and I can see leadership qualities in him as a first-year guy. He’s an honest player who just goes about his work.

“Teams today are built around speed, but in a fast league, Brett’s still one of the fastest guys. The other element that separates him is the way he competes. I saw it right in the beginning of training camp; he’s really a tenacious player and competes hard. He wants to get his nose in there and make a difference.”

Morreale also spoke to Devils head coach John Hynes about how Seney has been able to persevere in the NHL even though he may not be the biggest body on the ice.

“Maybe he doesn’t have the biggest body or size, but he has that explosive quickness, strength on his skates,” Devils coach John Hynes said. “He’s tenacious and not afraid of confrontation. He plays the game in the hard areas, and that’s why he’s been able to come in and have success.

“Every player in our locker room has some sort of NHL element to their game, but how do you impact and how do you push the needle in a more productive way? For us, we feel Brett is one of those guys.”

2) LOCAL PRINT/WEB

1. Why NJ Devils’ Cory Schneider is confident his luck will turn

By Abbey Mastracco, Fire and Ice

https://www.northjersey.com/story/sports/nhl/devils/fireandice/2018/12/09/why-nj-devils-cory-schneider-confident-his-luck-turn/2262010002/

ANAHEIM — Cory Schneider is having a tough year.

The Devils have scored on Schneider, their own goalie, in each of his last two starts. There was a start before that where he shut out a team for 59:30 but couldn’t get any offensive support.

It’s no secret the 32-year-old goalie is struggling to re-establish his game after a few years of hip injuries. The injuries are now past him after an offseason surgery but numbers show that he hasn’t quite found his game yet: 0-5-1 with a 4.29 GAA and a 0.863 save percentage.

So a trio of own-goals was the last thing he needed but it’s exactly what he got in a 6-5 shootout loss to the Anaheim Ducks on Sunday night at Honda Center.

“Bad bounces going into the net,” Schneider said. “I’m not sure how you view that in the prism of defending a league or playing in the third. But we didn’t quit.”

New Jersey didn’t quit, with Marcus Johansson working his 6-on-5 magic yet again and tying the game at 5-5 with 58 seconds left in regulation. The Devils are still searching for their first overtime win but getting the game into a shootout was a step in the right direction.

However, they don’t think they should have been in that position in the first place because Schneider gave New Jersey enough of a chance to win. It was the three goals put past Schneider by Stefan Noesen, Ben Lovejoy and Andy Greene that made the difference.

“You can’t do much about bad bounces and pucks getting deflected and not being able to see pucks,” Devils’ forward Kyle Palmieri said. “But for us, he’s battling in there and we’re trying to battle in front of him but pucks seem to just find their way off different things and end up in the back of the net.”

Devils’ coach John Hynes has never seen three own-goals like that at the NHL level. Maybe it speaks to just how bad Schneider’s luck has been or maybe it was just a strange night. Regardless, he doesn’t think Schneider’s performance was as bad as it the scoresheet would indicate.

“The fact that we put three in our net was a little bit of a different situation for sure,” Hynes said. “He got the start tonight and he made some strong saves. That’s what you’re looking for. I think you can see his game coming.”

Luck is a funny thing. Sometimes you have it and sometimes it’s out of your control. When things are going well, it might seem like a team gets a few more lucky bounces here and there. But when things are a struggle, as they have been for the Devils, those bad bounces seem to happen a little more often.

“My teammates step in front of a lot of pucks and block a lot of shots for me so obviously they’re not trying to do it on purpose,” Schneider said. “That’s hockey. When you’re going great and winning games everything seems to stay out but when you’re in a stretch like I am they all seem to go in.

“But it will turn, it won’t happen forever.”

Schneider is still taking ownership of the loss, as he has after every one of them and he’s had quite a few this year. He hasn’t won a regular season game since December 27, 2017.

Call it snakebitten or call it unlucky, he’s still not letting it get him down.

“He’s a true pro,” Hynes said. “He continues to work at it and maintain the right attitude and you can see his game is coming around. It was just unfortunate tonight that there were some odd bounces that didn’t help him.”

2. NJ Devils score 3 times on own net in 6-5 shootout loss to Ducks

By Abbey Mastracco, The Record

https://www.northjersey.com/story/sports/nhl/devils/2018/12/09/nj-devils-score-3-times-own-net-6-5-shootout-loss-ducks/2260463002/

ANAHEIM — Both goalies on the ice on Sunday night at Honda Center were chasing milestones of sorts.

Anaheim Ducks’ backup goalie Ryan Miller was one win shy of surpassing John Vanbiesbrouck’s mark of 374 wins, the most for an American-born goalie.

The other American-born goalie in the game was chasing a more dubious honor: His first regular-season win in a calendar year.

Neither goalie would reach those milestones.

Miller was injured in the third period and John Gibson became the goalie of record. The Devils, somewhat unbelievably, scored three times on their own goalie, Cory Schneider.

Perhaps more unbelievably, Marcus Johansson tied it up with 58 seconds left and the Devils made it to a shootout for the first time this season. But Ryan Getzlaf and Daniel Sprong scored for the Ducks in a shootout to give Anaheim (16-11-5) a 6-5 win. The Devils (10-12-6) lost their seventh game in eight tries.

“That’s the first time in my experiences where we had three that got in,” coach John Hynes said. “Sometimes something gets deflected in or hits someone else and goes in but those were a little bit odd tonight.”

Schneider made 35 saves and one in the shootout. Gibson denied the Devils’ two shooters, Kyle Palmieri and Taylor Hall.

Two of the three own-goal offenders, Stefan Noesen and Ben Lovejoy used to play for the Ducks. Andy Greene, the Devils’ captain, had the third offensive transgression.

“It was just a couple of bad bounces for us once again,” Schneider said. “That’s kind of been a recurring theme.”

Brett Seney put the Devils ahead 4-3 at the 9-minute mark of the second period when he cleaned up a rebound by Jesper Bratt. But at at 8:35 in the third, a Pontus Aberg shot took an errant bounce off the glove of Lovejoy and the game was knotted once again.

A wild scramble in front of the net resulted in a power play goal for the Ducks at 13:58. Greene batted in a shot by Ondrej Kase from midair.

An eventful first period resulted in six combined goals and a 3-3 score at the end of it. Both teams looked equal parts awesome and awful. Palmieri, who came to the Devils in a draft-day trade from Anaheim in 2015, scored twice for his fifth two-goal game of the season and his second straight.

Palmieri opened the scoring 1:38 into the game but it didn’t take long for Anaheim’s Jakob Silfverberg to net the equalizer. Noesen, one of four former Ducks now playing for New Jersey, then pinged a pass by Kiefer Sherwood into his own net to give the Ducks a lead at 2:47.

The momentum continued to swing wildly in each direction. Damon Severson finished off a tic-tac-toe passing sequence on the power play to put the Devils up 3-2 at 13:08 but the offender who gave the visitors a power play, Brandon Montour, scored 31 seconds later to tie the game at 3-3.

“The first was tough for both goalies but my guys kept coming back and putting them in,” Schneider said. “You try to shake that off and treat it like a 0-0 game and I thought I did a pretty good job of trying to shut it down and hold the fort there.”

It’s almost unbelievable the luck that Schneider has had — or maybe hasn’t had — over the last year. Schneider remains searching for his first win since December 27, 2017.

“Cory did a great job battling for us,” Palmieri said. “He’s a warrior and he’s going to keep battling and giving us a chance to win hockey games.”

Notes

Miller left the game with 12:47 left to play after a collision in the net and his win total remains at 374. … The Devils have scored an own-goal in each of Schneider’s last two starts with Sami Vatanen, another former Duck, scoring one in a loss in Tampa Bay on Nov. 25. … Noesen didn’t take a shift in the second period and logged just 5:17 on the ice. … The Devils scratched Drew Stafford, Mirco Mueller and Steven Santini. … Keith Kinkaid will get the start in net for the Devils on Monday night in San Jose.

3. Devils’s own goals lead to another loss for Cory Schneider against Ducks

By Chris Ryan, NJ.com

https://www.nj.com/devils/2018/12/devilss-own-goals-lead-to-another-loss-for-cory-schneider-against-ducks.html#incart_river_index

One own goal can be chalked up to a bad bounce. Two could be considered rotten luck.

But three own goals in one game? That type of misfortune seems almost comical.

Yet the Devils managed to put three pucks into their own net on Sunday, making life even tougher on goalie Cory Schneider, who was searching for his first win in his sixth start of the season.

Devils coach John Hynes had never seen anything like it during his career behind the bench.

“Those were a little bit odd tonight. It’s situations where you have to find a way to overcome,” Hynes told reporters in Anaheim. “It’s not something that you can let deflate you. You have to continue to play, continue to push and we felt as though we did that for the most part tonight.”

Despite all that, the Devils still had opportunities to win, but they managed to salvage just one point in a 6-5 shootout loss to the Anaheim Ducks at Honda Center in Anaheim, California.

The Ducks, trailing 4-3 entering the third period, made their predictable push to get back in the game. Schneider made seven saves on shots actually taken by Ducks in the final 20 minutes, but two pucks went in off his own defensemen after forward Stefan Noesen had already poked in one own goal in the first period.

The tying goal in the third period came off an innocently chipped puck toward net, where the Ducks seemed to be happy just to get the it down the ice for a line change. Instead, when Ben Lovejoy went to catch it, the puck bounced off his wrist and floated over Schneider, into the back of the net.

Then as the Devils killed off a Ducks power play, a mad scramble in front of net led to a puck bouncing in the air above the crease. Andy Greene attempted to whack it over the crossbar and behind the net. Instead, the puck went straight into the netting behind Schneider.

Again, despite all that, the Devils managed to tie the game on a Marcus Johansson 6-on-5 goal in the final minute, sending the game to overtime.

Schneider ended up with 33 saves on 38 shots, and he stopped all six shots he saw in overtime.

“He made a big save on (Adam) Henrique’s breakaway late in the game there,” Devils forward Kyle Palmieri said. “I mean, he is battling for us. It’s hard to see him go through the bad bounces and not finding a way to win games, but he is a warrior and he is going to keep battling, giving us a chance to win hockey games.”

Schneider did allow two early goals around the Noesen own goal, but he settled in to stop every actual Ducks shot the rest of the way.

“I mean, that first period was a little helter-skelter. I think both sides, (played) a little looser,” he said. “Not as many saves as we wanted, but you come out of it 3-3 and it is basically a 0-0 hockey game. You just have that mentality of starting over and I thought we did a good job in the second. I thought we took control of the game there and got the go ahead goal, and they [Ducks] made a push in the third.”

4. Devils lose to Ducks in shootout after 3 own goals in regulation | Rapid reaction

By Chris Ryan, NJ.com

https://www.nj.com/devils/2018/12/devils-lose-to-ducks-in-shootout-after-3-own-goals-in-regulation-rapid-reaction.html#incart_river_index

Goals by Daniel Sprong and Ryan Getzlaf gave the Anaheim Ducks a 6-5 shootout victory over the Devils on Sunday at Honda Center in Anaheim, California.

Kyle Palmieri and Taylor Hall both failed to score on their respective attempts. Hall hit the crossbar after Sprong beat goalie Cory Schneider for the first goal. Getzlaf then ended the game as the Ducks’ third shooter.

Overtime and the shootout came after 60 of the strangest minutes of hockey the Devils will play all season.

The Devils managed to score three — yes, three — own goals, including two in the third period that turned a 4-3 Devils lead into a 5-4 deficit. Those two odd deflections appeared to put the Devils in position for a devastating regulation defeat, but a Marcus Johansson 6-on-5 goal with Schneider on the bench tied the game at 5-5 with 58 seconds to play.

All of that came after the two teams combined for six goals in the first period, including the first own goal for the Devils.

Scoring plays

Schneider’s final stats don’t look terrific. He allowed five goals on 38 shots. But again, three of them came on some of the strangest bounces any goalie will see.

With the game tied 1-1 in the first period, a Kiefer Sherwood pass was poked past Schnedier by Devils forward Stefan Nosen, who was attempting to break up the play.

The Ducks tied the game at 4-4 in the third period when Devils defenseman Ben Lovejoy attempted to catch a puck flipped toward the crease by Ducks forward Pontus Aberg. Instead, the puck hit Lovejoy’s glove and bounced softly over Schneider, who couldn’t do much to stop it.

Then after Schneider made a couple tough saves to kill off a Ducks power play, but defenseman Andy Greene batted a puck out of midair and into net for a 5-4 lead.

Johansson then tied the game at 5-5 when he scored on a scramble in front in the final minutes, allowing the Devils to salvage one point.

Before that madness, you probably missed a goal If you blinked in the first half of the first period.

The teams traded six goals over the opening 13:39, resulting in a 3-3 tie that lasted until the first intermission. Each team held a lead during that stretch.

Palmieri scored the first of his two goals 1:38 into play when he popped in a rebound near the right post. A Egor Yakovlev shot rattled off the boards behind the net and back to Palmieri, who netted his 15th of the season.

Just 69 seconds later, the Ducks had a 2-1 lead. They tied it at 2:12 when a Jakob Silfverberg weaved through traffic and past Schneider. Noesen’s own goal put the Ducks up 2-1 at 2:47.

Noesen played three more shifts in the first period before sitting for the entire second period. He returned to the ice early in the third.

That 2-1 deficit didn’t last long for the Devils, who answered with two more goals. Palmieri tied it at 2-2 on his 16th of the season by one-timing a Taylor Hall pass from the right circle at 10:49.

Damon Severson capitalized on the Devils’ first power play at 13:08 when he popped in a shot from the left circle off a Marcus Johansson feed.

Brandon Montour capped off the craziness with another tying goal 31 seconds later, bringing the Ducks even at 3-3.

Both sides settled down from there until Seney gave the Devils a 4-3 lead at 9:00 of the second. After dropping a pass to Jesper Bratt near the right wall, Seney raced to the slot and found a rebound, which he sent five-hole on Ducks goalie Ryan Miller for his second of the season.

Next up

The Devils will end their California road trip with a 10:30 p.m. Eastern face-off against the San Jose Sharks on Monday at SAP Center in San Jose.

They will return home to host the Vegas Golden Knights at 7 p.m. on Friday at Prudential Center in Newark.

5. Devils earn one point in shootout loss to Ducks

By Amanda Stein, newjerseydevils.com

https://www.nhl.com/devils/news/devils-earn-one-point-in-shootout-loss-to-ducks/c-302777222

ANAHEIM, CA – Despite taking three separate leads against the Anaheim Ducks, and tying the game at five in the dying seconds on a goal by Marcus Johansson, the New Jersey Devils could not seal the deal against the Anaheim Ducks. The Devils dropped their Sunday matchup 6-5 in a shootout.

The Devils and Ducks traded six-goals in the first period alone in the high scoring affair, with the Devils going 1-0-1 so far on their California road trip. Their last stop is in San Jose Monday night.

Here are 10 takeaways from the game:

1. For the fifth time this season, Devils goaltender Cory Schneider was given the start in net. Schneider made 33 saves on 38 shots in regulation and overtime but went 1-for-3 in stopping Anaheim in the shootout.

2. The Devils boast four former Anaheim Ducks on their current roster. Stefan Noesen, Kyle Palmieri, Ben Lovejoy, and most recently, Sami Vatanen were all once members of the Ducks.

On Anaheim’s roster, forwards Adam Henrique and Brian Gibbons are former members of the New Jersey Devils.

3. While coach John Hynes elected to go with a lineup with the same skaters that won against the L.A. Kings earlier this week, he did make some adjustments on defense. The Devils defense lined up as follows:

Andy Greene – Damon Severson

Will Butcher – Sami Vatanen

Egor Yakovlev – Ben Lovejoy

Moving Butcher to the second pairing gave the second-year defenseman a chance at greater ice time. He played 25:01 for a season high in ice-time.

4. Kyle Palmieri began his two-point night by scoring the game’s opening goal just 1:38 after the opening puck drop. Palmieri cleaned up on an Egor Yakovlev shot that ricocheted off the end boards right onto Palmieri’s stick. The goal was Palmieri’s 15th of the season, as he continues to lead the Devils in the goal department.

Yakovlev earned the lone assist, the third assist and fourth point of his NHL career.

5. Though the Ducks would take a 2-1 lead after Palmieri’s opening goal, the former Duck and current Devil still wasn’t done scoring against his former team. At 10:49 of the first period, Palmieri – for a second consecutive game – scored his second goal of the night off a feed from Taylor Hall.

The two-goal effort in the first period, marked the fifth time this season Palmieri has scored two goals in a game. To date, the Devils are 4-0-1 when the New Jersey native registers two-goals in a game.

6. The Devils power play appears to have found a groove. For the third time in four games, New Jersey has scored a power play goal. The second unit connected at 13:08 of the opening 20-minutes where Marcus Johansson, from behind the Ducks net, found a streaking Damon Severson down the left side of the ice. Severson ripped a shot past Ducks netminder Ryan Miller for a 3-2 Devils lead.

7. With Hall’s assist on Palmieri’s second goal of the game, the dynamic forward now has 12 points his in past nine games. Hall has been wracking up the assists, with nine in his last nine games and adding three goals.

Hall is currently one goal shy of 200 in his NHL career.

8. After a six-goal output by both teams in the opening 20 minutes of play, just a single goal was scored in the second period. That goal went to Devils rookie Brett Seney, for his second career NHL goal.

Seney was opportunistic, driving to the net as Ducks Miller gave up a juicy rebound in the slot. The 22-year-old was in the right place at the right time to tap the puck in. The goal gave the Devils their third lead of the night at 9:00 of the second period.

9. New Jersey went nearly the entire game without taking a penalty. It was Damon Severson who was called for the Devils only penalty of the game, a hook with 8:09 left in regulation. It is the fourth time this season New Jersey has taken just a single penalty in a game.

10. Marcus Johansson had the Devils 6-on-5 goal to tie the game with under a minute to play. The forward tied the game at five after the Ducks had taken a one-goal lead at the 13:58 mark of the third period.

Johansson scored his second 6-on-5 goal of the season and his sixth overall goal to take the game into overtime. Nico Hischier and Brian Boyle were credited with the assists. Hischier now has five points (two goals, three assists) in his past five games.

3) TV/VIDEO LINKS

1. WATCH: NJ Devils’ Cory Schneider owns loss in game with three own-goals

By Abbey Mastracco, The Record

https://www.northjersey.com/videos/sports/nhl/devils/2018/12/10/watch-nj-devils-cory-schneider-owns-loss-game-three-own-goals/2261899002/

2. 12/9/18 Postgame: Cory Schneider

By New Jersey Devils, newjerseydevils.com

https://www.nhl.com/devils/video/12918-postgame-cory-schneider/t-277437418/c-63819203

3. 12/9/18 Postgame: Kyle Palmieri

By New Jersey Devils, newjerseydevils.com

https://www.nhl.com/devils/video/12918-postgame-kyle-palmieri/t-277437418/c-63819103

3. 12/9/18 Postgame: John Hynes

By New Jersey Devils, newjerseydevils.com

https://www.nhl.com/devils/video/12918-postgame-john-hynes/t-277437418/c-63819003

4. 12/9/18 Players to Watch

By New Jersey Devils, newjerseydevils.com

https://www.nhl.com/devils/video/12918-players-to-watch/t-277437418/c-63807103

5. 12/9/18 Pregame: John Hynes

By New Jersey Devils, newjerseydevils.com

https://www.nhl.com/devils/video/12918-pregame-john-hynes/t-277437418/c-63805903

6. DEVILS GET A POINT IN WILD ONE IN ANAHEIM: HIGHLIGHTS & ANALYSIS

By MSG Networks

https://www.msgnetworks.com/videos/devils-get-a-point-in-wild-one-in-anaheim-highlights-analysis/

7. ON THE ICE WITH DANO & SAL: SENEY & GAINING LEVERAGE VS. DEFENSEMEN

By MSG Networks

https://www.msgnetworks.com/videos/on-the-ice-with-dano-sal-seney-gaining-leverage-vs-defensemen/

8. SCHNEIDER TALKS SHOOTOUT LOSS TO DUCKS & HIS EFFORT

By MSG Networks

https://www.msgnetworks.com/videos/schneider-talks-shootout-loss-to-ducks-his-effort/

9. JOHN HYNES MIC’D UP AT DEVILS PRACTICE

By MSG Networks

https://www.msgnetworks.com/videos/john-hynes-micd-up-at-devils-practice/

4) RADIO LINKS – N/A

5) NATIONAL PRINT/WEB

1. Ducks top Devils in shootout for sixth victory in seven games

By Dan Arritt, NHL.com

https://www.nhl.com/news/new-jersey-devils-anaheim-ducks-game-recap/c-302766104

ANAHEIM — Ondrej Kase had a goal and two assists and the Anaheim Ducks came from behind three times in a 6-5 shootout win against the New Jersey Devils at Honda Center on Sunday.

Brandon Montour had a goal and an assist, Ryan Getzlaf had two assists and scored the deciding goal in the shootout for Anaheim (16-11-5), which has won six of its past seven games.

Ryan Miller allowed four goals on 27 shots for Anaheim before leaving at 7:13 of the third period with an injury. John Gibson replaced him and made seven saves.

Kyle Palmieri scored two goals, Marcus Johansson had a goal and an assist, Jesper Bratt had two assists and Cory Schneider made six of his 32 saves in overtime for New Jersey (10-12-6), which scored into its own net three times.

“It was a bizarre game,” Ducks coach Randy Carlyle said. “It was one of those games that seemed like the last shot would win it.”

Johansson tied game at 5-5 with 58 seconds left in the third period and Schneider pulled for an extra skater.

“Three or four of the last times we have pulled the goalie we seem to have scored and tied it up,” Schneider said.

Kase was credited with the goal that gave the Ducks a 5-4 lead at 13:58 of the third period. New Jersey defenseman Andy Greene tried to slap the puck out of the air but he hit it into his own net.

Pontus Aberg tied the game 4-4 at 8:35 of the third period for the Ducks. He flipped the puck toward the New Jersey net from just inside the blue line. Devils defenseman Ben Lovejoy tried to stop the puck with his glove, but it deflected off Schneider’s glove and into the net.

“We got a little bit lucky getting goals off their players but we stuck to it,” Aberg said.

Brett Seney gave the Devils a 4-3 lead at 9:00 of the second period. Miller made a save on Bratt’s shot from the right circle but the rebound came out to the slot and Seney was there to score on a one-timer.

Each team scored three times in the first period.

Palmieri, who has four goals in his past two games, gave the Devils a 1-0 lead at 1:38.

Egor Yakovlev shot wide and the puck went off the end boards and came out just to the left of Miller. Palmieri was in position to lift the puck over the outstretched left pad of Miller for a 1-0 lead.

Jakob Silfverberg scored for the third straight game to make it 1-1 at 2:12.

Anaheim defenseman Josh Manson stopped the puck just before it exited the New Jersey zone and passed it to Silfverberg, who made a stick move to turn around Devils forward Nico Hischier and scored from just above the left circle.

Kiefer Sherwood gave Anaheim a 2-1 lead at 2:47. He tried to center a pass to Carter Rowney but the puck hit the stick of New Jersey forward Stefan Noesen, went off his leg and across the goal line for a 2-1 lead at 2:47.

It was the fastest three goals by two teams to open a game this season.

Palmieri made it 2-2 at 10:49. Taylor Hall stole the puck behind the Anaheim net, fed Palmieri from below the goal line and he scored on a one-timer from the right circle.

New Jersey regained a 3-2 lead when Damon Severson scored on the power play at 13:08.

After Montour was called for hooking Travis Zajac at 11:46, Johansson received a pass just below the goal line and he made a diagonal pass through the crease to Severson, who scored on a one-timer.

Anaheim was headed for its first power play but Montour scored from the right circle before it could begin, tying the game 3-3 at 13:39.

“That first period was a little helter-skelter,” Schneider said.

They said it

“It was the first time in my experience where you had three [own goals] that went in. Something gets deflected in and hits someone else and goes in. Those were a little bit odd tonight.” — Devils coach John Hynes

“When you get a few of those bounces, it’s big. We didn’t get any in the first two months of the season. It’s nice to get a couple tonight.” — Ducks forward Ryan Getzlaf

Need to know

Miller was trying for his 375th NHL win, which would have moved him past John Vanbiesbrouck as the winningest U.S.-born goalie in NHL history. Carlyle did not provide an update on his injury. … Getzlaf has 12 points (four goals, eight assists) in the past 11 games. He needs one point for 900 in his NHL career. … The shootout was the first this season for New Jersey. … Hall has 12 points (three goals, nine assists) in the past nine games.

What’s next

Devils: At the San Jose Sharks on Monday (10:30 p.m. ET; SN, NBCSCA, MSG+, NHL.TV)

Ducks: Host the Dallas Stars on Wednesday (10 p.m. ET; PRIME, FS-SW+, NHL.TV)

2. Rookie watch: Hard work paying off for Seney with Devils

By Mike Morreale, NHL.com

https://www.nhl.com/news/rookie-center-brett-seney-impressing-new-jersey-devils/c-302768328

Brett Seney has impressed teammates and coaches with his speed and competitive nature in his first season with the New Jersey Devils.

Since making his NHL debut Nov. 3, the rookie center has two goals, three assists and 19 shots on goal in 18 games with the Devils. The 22-year-old scored his first NHL goal Nov. 11 at the Winnipeg Jets.

“He wants to not only be here, but stay here,” Devils forward Brian Boyle said. “He’s a mature kid, and I can see leadership qualities in him as a first-year guy. He’s an honest player who just goes about his work.

“Teams today are built around speed, but in a fast league, Brett’s still one of the fastest guys. The other element that separates him is the way he competes. I saw it right in the beginning of training camp; he’s really a tenacious player and competes hard. He wants to get his nose in there and make a difference.”

Seney, chosen by the Devils in the sixth round (No. 157) of the 2015 NHL Draft, has played center and wing in a third and fourth-line role with New Jersey, but he said he prefers center because his speed enables him to quickly find open areas. Seney (5-foot-9, 156 pounds) has shown he can be a responsible player in the defensive zone.

“Maybe he doesn’t have the biggest body or size, but he has that explosive quickness, strength on his skates,” Devils coach John Hynes said. “He’s tenacious and not afraid of confrontation. He plays the game in the hard areas, and that’s why he’s been able to come in and have success.

“Every player in our locker room has some sort of NHL element to their game, but how do you impact and how do you push the needle in a more productive way? For us, we feel Brett is one of those guys.”

Seney understands he needs to continue to play a hard and responsible game to remain a fixture in the lineup.

“It’s definitely in the back of your head, earning your role and sticking on the roster,” he said. “I think every day is a new opportunity to go out there and show what you could do and kind of move up that ladder. Being a smaller guy, maybe I have to take a couple more strides out there to keep up with some of the bigger guys with longer strides.

“I think for as long as I can remember, skating has always been my best asset and that was something from a young age that I knew, as a smaller guy, if I wanted to make it, I had to skate so that was a huge focus. I proved to myself I could play with these guys and getting it done in college was probably the point where I kind of had that thought that making it to the NHL was a possibility.”

Seney, born in London, Ontario, dreamed of playing in the Ontario Hockey League, but instead felt the Ontario Junior Hockey League and college route would be a better fit.

He wasn’t surprised to be passed over his first year of eligibility in the 2014 NHL Draft as a second-year player in the OJHL with Kingston.

“I put up a lot of points (69), but I think there were a lot of parts to my game that I needed to improve too,” Seney said.

Seney began opening some eyes as a freshman at Merrimack College in North Andover, Massachusetts, in 2014-15. He scored 26 points (11 goals, 15 assists) in 34 games and was drafted by the Devils.

Seney played four seasons at Merrimack and scored 115 points (42 goals, 73 assists) in 139 games before the Devils signed him to a two-year, entry-level contract March 16. He had 18 points (four goals, 14 assists) with Binghamton of the American Hockey League in 22 games the past two seasons before being promoted.

“I was quite a bit smaller when I was 16, so I started looking at some school routes (including University of Massachusetts, Clarkson, Providence), and watched college games and fell in love with the atmosphere,” Seney said. “Merrimack was a smaller school, a lesser-known school, but the staff there with head coach Mark Dennehy and assistants Curtis Carr and Bill Gilligan really helped me a lot.”

Dennehy was hired to coach Binghamton on Aug. 1, so he knew of Seney’s skating ability and opportunistic mindset in the offensive zone.

“What I’m proudest of with Brett is, No. 1, he’s an unbelievable competitor,” Dennehy said. “He plays his tail off, he wants to play fast. He’s incredibly dynamic, and he really worked on getting stronger.”

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New Jersey Devils News & Clips: Dec. 6, 2018

  1. SUMMARY
  2. LOCAL PRINT/WEB
  3. TV/VIDEO LINKS
  4. RADIO LINKS
  5. NATIONAL PRINT/WEB

    1) SUMMARY

     

    The Devils will face-off with the Los Angeles Kings tonight at Staples Center (10:30 pm, FS-W, MSG+). Tonight’s game is the first of two contests between New Jersey and Los Angeles. The Devils are 3-2-2 against Western Conference teams this season.

    Chris Ryan, NJ.com, spoke to Devils head coach John Hynes about prospect Michael McLeod and why he was sent back down to the AHL after appearing in one game in the NHL.

    “We think it was a great thing for his development, for the organization,” Hynes said. “Now you have a motivated player that’s self directed in the sense that he knows he’s got to improve and what he needs to work on in Binghamton.”

    “He’s had lots of success as a young player, but he’s not above playing in the American League and earning his stripes and understanding his game has to be better,” Hynes said. “It’s not just all about being in the NHL, living the NHL lifestyle. This kid wants to play hockey. He wants to get better. He’s appreciative of the opportunity. It was a great development experience for him, but it’s guys like that, that understand where they’re at in their careers and they have the right mindset, those are the guys that develop.”

    Ryan also spoke to Devils captain Andy Greene about what he believes the team needs to do in order to stop their losing streak and have success on their western roadtrip.

    “We have to sit there and pick each other up and battle and compete. Those things take zero skill,” defenseman Andy Greene said. “That’s just all about work ethic and how we want to play. You’re not talking about making highly skilled plays here. It’s defending hard at the puck, being in the right position and stuff like that. That’s just stuff where we need to be way better, way tougher, way harder.”

    2) LOCAL PRINT/WEB

     

    1. The change Devils’ Jesper Bratt credits with getting to the NHL

    By Abbey Mastracco, The Record

    https://www.northjersey.com/story/sports/nhl/devils/2018/12/04/change-nj-devils-jesper-bratt-credits-getting-nhl/2205982002/

The change Devils’ Jesper Bratt credits with getting to the NHL

www.northjersey.com

Jesper Bratt wasn’t enjoying hockey anymore so he sought out someone who would help him enjoy it again. It changed his career.

  1. NEWARK — There was a period of time where hockey didn’t feel the way it used to for Jesper Bratt.

    The Devils’ speedy scorer was splitting time between his junior team in Sweden and a second-tier professional team. Canada was on the horizon, as Bratt, then just a teenager, was planning to play in the Ontario Hockey League to be able to adjust to North American ice before taking the next step in his career with the Devils, who had drafted him in the sixth round of the 2016 NHL Draft.

    But every time Bratt stepped out on the ice it felt as though the world was on his shoulders.

    “I felt a lot of pressure on myself before games,” Bratt said. “I didn’t really enjoy the games and have fun. I just felt like everything was a big pressure for me.”

    The feeling had crept up on him, building up throughout his last season in Sweden until he hit a breaking point. Bratt saw how close he was to the NHL and he owed it to himself to give a shot, but he knew a change was needed.

    So, he reached out to his agent and asked if he could connect him with Andy Sward, a renowned mental skills coach who works with several Swedish hockey players and golfers.

    “I just felt like I wanted to take the next step in my career,” the 20-year-old Bratt said. “My (mindset) was something that needed to be changed.”

    While Sward’s clients are mainly based in Sweden, his position is one on the rise in sports. Several professional teams employ mental skills coaches in addition to team psychologists.

    It’s especially popular in baseball and hockey, where the complexities of the game make it easy to overthink things. The Mets have employed a few of them, even having Will Lenzner travel with the team during the 2017 season before he went to the Los Angeles Angels last season. The Houston Astros have available to work with prospects remotely.

    The experience was exactly what Bratt was hoping for. Sward slowly helped reinvigorate him.

    Hockey became fun again.

    “That’s something he really helped me with, getting back to why I play,” he said. “Because it’s fun. It makes me more comfortable.”

    Sward honed in Bratt’s pregame preparation, helping him get into a calm headspace before games in order to ease the pressure he was feeling when games began.

    “He just helps me get ready, making sure my mind is where it should be and I feel calm and I feel comfortable with the situation and games and stuff,” Bratt said. “It helps me be calm and make me know what I should do out there in the games. I don’t get nervous.”

    Now, here’s where the work with Sward is being tested.

    Bratt is off to another fast start this season. In 12 games since returning from a broken jaw, Bratt has nine points (two goals, seven assists). One of his two goals, a power play goal scored Saturday night against the Winnipeg Jets, not only snapped a 0-for-15 streak with the man-advantage, but it also helped the Devils rally for a third-period comeback. He’s part of a second power play unit that has been generating far more offense and momentum than the top unit and he’s made an impact on the forecheck by sparking a struggling second line.

    This is nothing new for Bratt. Last year, he got off to a hot start as well and he credited his near-daily sessions with Sward. They talked before every game and often after practices.

    But Bratt ran out of gas after the All-Star break last season. He took it in stride, understanding where he went wrong and why he was a healthy scratch throughout much of the final month of the season. He may not have been so levelheaded about it had it not been for Sward.

    Bratt is confident that this year will be different. He’s more sure of himself as an NHL player and more sure of his skill set. The sessions with Sward have decreased.

    “This year I kind of know a little bit more of what’s going on,” he said. “Maybe three times a month maybe, maybe a little bit more.”

    Bratt has to prove that he can produce for an entire season. But he already took one big step in his career with Sward and he’s confident he can take the next with his help as well.

    “It’s just so important,” the 20-year-old Bratt said. “Without that kind of mental support that I have from him, I probably would not be here at this point or even last year. That for sure changed my career.”

    2. Why Michael McLeod went back to AHL after 1 game with Devils

    By Chris Ryan, NJ.com

    https://www.nj.com/devils/2018/12/why-michael-mcleod-went-back-to-ahl-after-1-game-with-devils.html#incart_river_index

    The morning after making his NHL debut on Nov. 30, Michael McLeod met with Devils coaches in Newark. Later that day, the 2016 first-round pick went back to AHL Binghamton, capping a brief first stint in New Jersey.

    From that meeting, Devils coaches and management made the decision to return him to Binghamton based on their assessment, plus the one McLeod gave of his own game.

    “The words out of his mouth: ‘I have to get to get to another level. It’s bigger here. It’s stronger here. It’s faster here,’” Devils coach John Hynes said. “Now you have a real important part of your organization, he’s got a taste of the NHL, he’s gone down and done a good job in Binghamton. But he himself says, ‘My face-offs, my wall play, my speed, all those things are at a higher level.’”

    Hynes did say McLeod’s debut came in a game where he didn’t get many opportunities. McLeod played just 5:36 in a 6-3 loss to the Washington Capitals, where the Devils trailed for the majority of the night. The two teams combined for 19 minutes of power plays, and McLeod did not have a role on either of the two special teams units. Hynes also said McLeod was, understandably, nervous heading into his first career game.

    Hearing that out of McLeod might sound like a red flag, but Hynes pointed to it as an important step in McLeod’s evolution as a player.

    “We think it was a great thing for his development, for the organization,” Hynes said. “Now you have a motivated player that’s self directed in the sense that he knows he’s got to improve and what he needs to work on in Binghamton.”

    In 22 AHL games this season, McLeod has three goals and eight assists for 11 points. He’s still in the beginning of his first pro season at any level, so Hynes and Devils brass will let him continue to develop his game.

    “He’s had lots of success as a young player, but he’s not above playing in the American League and earning his stripes and understanding his game has to be better,” Hynes said. “It’s not just all about being in the NHL, living the NHL lifestyle. This kid wants to play hockey. He wants to get better. He’s appreciative of the opportunity. It was a great development experience for him, but it’s guys like that, that understand where they’re at in their careers and they have the right mindset, those are the guys that develop.”

    3. Devils practice report: Jesper Bratt returns, lines and pairings, more

    By Chris Ryan, NJ.com

    https://www.nj.com/devils/2018/12/jesper-bratt-returns-to-devils-practice.html#incart_river_index

    Forward Jesper Bratt returned to practice Wednesday at Prudential Center in Newark after he missed the Devils’ 5-1 home loss to the Tampa Bay Lightning on Monday due to illness.

    Bratt jumped back into his usual spot in the top six during Wednesday’s drills, skating on the second line with Pavel Zacha and Marcus Johansson.

    All 22 other members of the active roster also skated on Wednesday prior to the team’s departure for California. The Devils start a three-game swing there with a 10:30 p.m. Eastern game against the Los Angeles Kings on Thursday at Staples Center in Los Angeles.

    The Devils will head west riding a six-game losing streak, which matches their longest skid from the 2017-18 season. They’re 0-3-3 during their current run.

    After games against three elite teams in the Washington Capitals, Winnipeg Jets and Lightning, the Devils will open their trip against a Kings team that sits last in the NHL.

    Regardless of their record, the Devils simply need to be a harder team to play against.

    “We have to sit there and pick each other up and battle and compete. Those things take zero skill,” defenseman Andy Greene said. “That’s just all about work ethic and how we want to play. You’re not talking about making highly skilled plays here. It’s defending hard at the puck, being in the right position and stuff like that. That’s just stuff where we need to be way better, way tougher, way harder.”

    Here’s how the Devils skated in Wednesday’s practice:

    FORWARDS

    Hall-Hischier-Palmieri

    Johansson-Zajac-Bratt

    Coleman-Zajac-Wood

    Boyle-Seney-Noesen/Stafford

    DEFENSEMEN

    Mirco Mueller-Sami Vatanen

    Andy Greene-Damon Severson

    Will Butcher-Ben Lovejoy

    Egor Yakovlev-Steven Santini

    GOALIES

    Cory Schneider/Keith Kinkaid

    4. Devils food drive in collaboration with GOYA exceeds 70,000 lbs of food

    By New Jersey Devils, newjerseydevils.com

    https://www.nhl.com/devils/news/devils-food-drive-in-collaboration-with-goya-exceeds-70000-lbs-of-food/c-302652966

Devils food drive in collaboration with GOYA exceeds 70,000 lbs of food | NHL.com

www.nhl.com

Newark, NJ (December 6, 2018) – The New Jersey Devils and Prudential Center, have given back to the community with a donation of over 70,000 pounds of food and over 2,000 meals to community …

Newark, NJ (December 6, 2018) – The New Jersey Devils and Prudential Center, have given back to the community with a donation of over 70,000 pounds of food and over 2,000 meals to community organizations around Newark and northern New Jersey thanks to Goya and New Jersey Devils fans. Each season the New Jersey Devils host an annual food drive, in partnership with Goya, where all fans and employees are encouraged to participate in giving back to those in need. Goya, the largest Hispanic food company owned in the United States, agreed to match up to 40,000 pounds of food collected through the Devils’ drives, which has been donated to the Community FoodBank of New Jersey. Beyond the great success of the annual drive, the Devils’ have formed an immediately impactful partnership with Transfernation, a food rescue service that collects cooked and unserved food, that is then distributed to organizations that serve homeless, low-income individuals and others in need, making Prudential Center the first arena to partner with the organization. Through Transfernation’s services, the New Jersey Devils and Prudential Center have already donated over 1,881 pounds of food.

3) TV/VIDEO LINKS – N/A

4) RADIO LINKS – N/A

5) NATIONAL PRINT/WEB – N/A  

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New Jersey Devils News & Clips: Dec. 5, 2018

December 5, 2018 • NEW JERSEY DEVILS NEWS & CLIPS

  1. SUMMARY
  2. LOCAL PRINT/WEB
  3. TV/VIDEO LINKS
  4. RADIO LINKS

NATIONAL PRINT/WEB

1) SUMMARY

 

The Devils will face-off with the Los Angeles Kings for the first time tomorrow night at Staples Center (10:30 pm, FS-W, MSG+).

 

Devils center, Brian Boyle, went on Sportsnets “31 Thoughts” podcast to join Jeff and Elliotte. They discuss coaches who have impacted his career, Boyle’s battle with leukaemia and his wife, Lauren’s, work with Hockey Fights Cancer, improving his skating, social media and the Devils this season.

Corey Masisak, The Athletic, examined what could happen to the Devils roster when the expansion draft happens in 2021 for the new team in Seattle.

2) LOCAL PRINT/WEB – N/A

3) TV/VIDEO LINKS – N/A

4) RADIO LINKS

 

1. Dec. 3, 2018: Brian Boyle’s Journey

By Sportsnet.ca

https://www.sportsnet.ca/podcasts/31-thoughts-podcast/dec-3-2018-brian-boyles-journey/

5) NATIONAL PRINT/WEB

 

1. How a Seattle expansion draft in 2021 might impact the Devils (version 1.0)

By Corey Masisak, The Athletic

https://theathletic.com/694500/2018/12/04/how-a-seattle-expansion-draft-in-2021-might-impact-the-devils-version-1-0/

The NHL officially welcomed the city of Seattle to the family Tuesday, announcing that an expansion team will begin play at the start of the 2021-22 season.

For the Original 30, that means another influx of cash and more importantly for the roster, another expansion draft to navigate. Many teams did not enjoy the expansion draft process in the summer of 2017 when the Vegas Golden Knights came into existence.

The Devils were among the teams that escaped it relatively unscathed. Jon Merrill was a pretty fungible asset to lose — a third-pairing defenseman — and New Jersey had enough depth last season for his absence to not be a problem.

The next expansion draft process, which Vegas gets to skip out on, might not be as painless.

We took a look at a potential 2020 expansion draft for the Devils over the summer, but the Totems/Sasquatch/Teen Spirits/TBD will not begin playing until the 2021-22 season. In a nice bit of good fortune, we also projected New Jersey’s 2021-22 roster in a separate exercise, and that will come in handy here.

Here’s the projected roster, from that story:

Three-and-a-half months later, there’s probably not a lot to change to that projected roster. Whether or not Jesper Boqvist will eventually be a center in the NHL is still in question. He’s playing on the wing for Brynas in the Swedish Hockey League. Fabian Zetterlund’s path to being an NHL regular might take a little longer than projected this past summer — he was getting fourth-line minutes in the SHL and is now injured.

Cory Schneider’s struggles to start this season are a huge concern, but his contract and his performance make it highly unlikely he’s going anywhere anytime soon. He’ll be given more opportunities to turn his season around.

It seems pretty obvious, especially given the slow start to this season, that the Devils will shake up the roster a little more between now and the start of the 2021-22 season, but here is the new projected forward group:

Three-and-a-half months later, there’s probably not a lot to change to that projected roster. Whether or not Jesper Boqvist will eventually be a center in the NHL is still in question. He’s playing on the wing for Brynas in the Swedish Hockey League. Fabian Zetterlund’s path to being an NHL regular might take a little longer than projected this past summer — he was getting fourth-line minutes in the SHL and is now injured.

Cory Schneider’s struggles to start this season are a huge concern, but his contract and his performance make it highly unlikely he’s going anywhere anytime soon. He’ll be given more opportunities to turn his season around.

It seems pretty obvious, especially given the slow start to this season, that the Devils will shake up the roster a little more between now and the start of the 2021-22 season, but here is the new projected forward group:

That projection includes new contracts for Hall, Palmieri, Coleman and Vatanen, plus the assortment of guys who will be restricted free agents between now and then.

Here’s a reminder of the expansion draft rules, which will be the same for Seattle as they were for Vegas.

Teams have the option of protecting seven forwards, three defensemen and one goalie, or eight skaters and one goalie.

Players with no-movement clauses have to be protected. First- and second-year pros along with unsigned draft picks are exempt from the expansion draft.

Teams must make a defenseman and two forwards available who played 40 games the previous season or 70 combined in the previous two seasons.

One goalie must be made available.

The Devils’ exemptions

The Devils don’t have any players who have no-move clauses in their contracts. Anyone who is in college or playing for a junior team right now will be exempt, so scratch Boqvist, Ty Smith, Reilly Walsh and Jeremy Davies from the list (plus Zetterlund, Aarne Talvitie and Mikhail Maltsev, among the club’s top prospects).

Everyone who is playing in Binghamton this season, or splitting the year between there and New Jersey, will be eligible.

The Devils’ way-too-early protected list

We’re 30 months from the draft, but with this projected roster for 2021-22 it seems pretty obvious for the Devils to protect seven forwards and three defensemen.

F Taylor Hall

F Nico Hischier

F Kyle Palmieri

F Jesper Bratt

F Joey Anderson

At the moment, those five forwards look pretty easy to project. It’s the final two spots that are pretty tricky. There are seven forwards above (plus several more playing for Binghamton this season) who could be options, let alone a current forward like Stefan Noesen or Marcus Johansson sticking around for two more seasons or any additions from outside the organization.

F Pavel Zacha

F Blake Coleman

If Zacha is still the team’s No. 2 center 2.5 seasons from now, he’ll be protected. That’s still far from concrete though. Michael McLeod is a first-round pick and could easily make himself into a core player over the next 30 months, but right now Coleman looks like a jack-of-all-trades with staying power. He’ll also have just recently signed a new contract, according to this projection, while Miles Wood will be going into the final year of his current deal.

D Sami Vatanen

D Will Butcher

D Damon Severson

Nevertheless, there’s still one potential issue: The three defensemen are pretty obvious, but remember New Jersey needs to leave one who played 40 games in 2020-21 or 70 in the next two seasons combined exposed.

There are two potential solutions for this. One is either Walsh or Davies won’t actually be a regular in the 2020-21 season, which means Santini or someone else will have the opportunity to accrue the 40 games needed. The other would be the Devils make a trade for a defenseman before the expansion draft with the intent of exposing him.

G Mackenzie Blackwood

We have no idea where Schneider’s career is going to go from here. If he snaps out of his funk, it’s entirely possible that he’ll resume being a solid or better No. 1 goaltender over the next two seasons. If he doesn’t, it’s possible the Devils could pursue a buyout or a trade, but neither of those things are happening until there is less term left on his contract.

All of that said, Schneider will be 35 when the 2021-22 season starts and in the final year of his current deal. We also have no idea if Blackwood’s strong start to this season is a real step forward. If it is, he could be the No. 1 goalie 30 months from now, or at least primed to claim that job.

Regardless, the only thing clear about the future of the Devils’ goaltending situation is that it is most definitely unclear at the moment.

Who does that leave for Seattle?

Could Schneider ultimately end up in Seattle? The guy manning the crease in Vegas had a somewhat similar story — a nosedive in play (though Marc-Andre Fleury’s problems were limited mostly to the postseason), followed by a rebound to form and eventually a new start with an expansion franchise.

There are several intriguing forwards for the Kraken/Sockeyes/Black Hole Suns/TBD to choose from as well. Wood might still be a tantalizing player, and a new franchise might like to take its chance at harnessing his potential. McLeod or Quenneville could fit the Vegas model of a player with speed and potential who needed a chance at a bigger role elsewhere.

Conclusion

The Devils seem likely to have a lot more interesting options to offer Seattle than they did for Vegas. The future of the roster could also be in greater flux today than it was a few months ago after a bad stretch of 20 games

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New Jersey Devils Post-Game Notes: Dec. 3 vs. Tampa Bay

New Jersey Devils 1 vs. Tampa Bay Lightning 5

  • Attendance: 13,394
  • Three Stars: 1. N. Kucherov 2. B. Point 3. L. Domingue
  • CLICK to see NJD Beat Writer, Amanda C. Stein’s 10 Takeaways from the game**

 

TEAM NOTES

  • The Devils fell to the Lightning, 5-1, in their final head-to-head contest of the 2018-19 campaign.
  • Marcus Johansson led the team with four shots on goal.
  • Damon Severson led the team in time-on-ice, skating in 19:24 minutes.  Additionally, Severson tallied one shot on goal in the contest.
  • With tonight’s regulation loss, New Jersey is now winless in their last five games, their longest streak without a regulation win (Nov. 23-Dec. 3, 0-3-2)
  • The Devils conclude their 2018-19 season matchup with the Lightning, finishing 0-3-0.

     

    PLAYER NOTES

     

  • Keith Kinkaid got the start in net for his 21st start of the season, playing in 39:57 minutes, stopping 16 of 20 shots faced.
  • Cory Schneider came in to relief Kinkaid at the start of the third frame, playing in 19:56, stopping 5 of 6 shots faced.
  • Egor Yakovlev got the Devils on the board at 11:26 in the first frame, tallying his first career NHL/Devils goal, getting the helpers from Sami Vatanen and Stefan Noesen. With his goal, Yakovlev becomes the 12th Devils defenseman to score his first career goal by his eighth career game (Credit: Craig Seiden, Devils hockey statistician).

     

    STATISTICS

     

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New Jersey Devils Pre-Game Notes: Nov. 26 vs. Florida

New Jersey Devils (9-10-3) @ Florida Panthers (8-9-4)
7:00 PM ET • BB&T Center • FS-F / MSG+ 2 • Devils Hockey Network

*Links for Devils Hockey Network can be found on newjerseydevils.com and on Devils’ social media channels.*

Check @NJDevils on Twitter for Morning Skate Interviews

Pre-Game Availability *subject to change

11:30 AM Morning Skate at BB&T Center*

LAST GAME: NOV. 21 – NEW JERSEY 2 @ TAMPA BAY 5

The Devils fell to the Lightning, 5-2, in their second of three contests in the regular season.  New Jersey falls to 0-2-0 against Tampa Bay in the 2018-19 regular season series.

 

This matchup starts New Jersey’s third of 14 sets of back-to-back contests.  The club falls to 0-2-1 in first games, and is 0-2-0 in second games.

New Jersey went 2-3 on the penalty kill tonight,  and has gone 14-15 in their last five contests.

 

Stefan Noesen started the scoring for the Devils at 9:39 in the first period, with help from Brett Seney.  Noesen tallied his first goal since New Jersey’s first game of the regular season (14 GP).

 

Jesper Bratt picked up his first goal of season on a breakaway.  Bratt has tallied a point (1g-5a) in six of nine games played since returning from injury.

 

Nico Hischier played in his 100th NHL/Devils career game.  The 2017 first overall draft pick recorded 15:11 TOI, and recorded one shot on net.

Cory Schneider started against the Lightning, stopping 30 of 35 shots faced.  Schneider falls to 4-5-1 in his career against Tampa Bay.

New Jersey and Tampa Bay’s third and final regular season matchup will be December 3rd at Prudential Center.

 

TONIGHT’S GAME @ FLORIDA PANTHERS

Tonight’s game is the second of three regular season contests between New Jersey and Florida.  The Devils are 1-5-1 against Atlantic Division foes, and 5-8-1 against Eastern Conference opponents. 

 

In the clubs’ first matchup on  October 27th at Prudential Center, the Devils defeated the Panthers, 3-2.  Nico Hischier (1G-1A), and Kyle Palmieri (1G-1A) led New Jersey in scoring with two points.  Five different players recorded one point for Florida (2G-3A).

Keith Kinkaid started in the first matchup against Florida, allowing two goals on 37 shots faced.  For the Panthers, James Reimer allowed three goals on 26 shots.

Tonight’s contest will conclude New Jersey’s third of 14 sets of back-to-back games.  The clubs’ fourth set of back-to-back matchups will be Nov. 30 (@ WSH) and Dec. 1 (vs. WPG).

New Jersey and Florida’s third and final matchup of the 2018-19 regular season series will be on April 6th, at BB&T Center.

 

INJURIES

Steven Santini (Broken Jaw, suffered Oct. 20) is on I.R., 14 games missed

Joey Anderson (Lower-body, suffered Nov. 21) is on I.R., 2 games missed

 

Total Man-Games Missed60

 

MILESTONES

 

Nico Hischier – 100th NHL/Devils GP (Nov. 25 @ TB)

Mirco Mueller – 100th NHL GP (Nov. 18 @ CAR)

Will Butcher – 100th NHL/Devils GP (Nov. 18 @ CAR)

Brian Boyle – 700th NHL GP (Oct. 25 vs NSH)

– 200th NHL career point (G; Nov. 23 vs NYI)

Andy Greene –800 GP NHL/Devils career (Nov. 5 at PIT)

Ben Lovejoy – 5 PTS for 200 NHL career

Travis Zajac – 300th NHL/Devils career assist (Nov. 13 vs PIT)

Taylor Hall – 100th Devils assist (Nov. 13 vs PIT)

-4 G for 200 NHL career

-3 A for 300 NHL career

-7 PTS for 500 NHL career

 

RECENT TRANSACTIONS

Nov. 25:-Terminated Steven Santini LTIR conditioning stint in Binghamton (AHL), and place back on I.R.

Nov. 23:-Assigned Eric Gryba to Binghamton (AHL) on I.R.

-Activated Brian Boyle, and Sami Vatanen off I.R.

Nov. 20:-Assigned Steven Santini to Binghamton (AHL) on LTI conditioning loan

Nov. 17: -Placed Sami Vatanen on I.R

-Recalled Eric Gryba from Binghamton (AHL)

Nov. 13: -Placed Brian Boyle on I.R

-Recalled Pavel Zacha from Binghamton (AHL)

Nov. 9: -Activated Jesper Bratt off I.R.

– Eddie Lack cleared waivers (prev. conditioning loan), assigned to Binghamton (AHL)

– Assigned forward Kurtis Gabriel to Binghamton (AHL)

– Activated Stefan Noesen off I.R.

Nov. 3: -Placed Stefan Noesen on I.R. and activated Drew Stafford off I.R.

 

BRODEUR IMMORTALIZED

The New Jersey Devils honored three-time Stanley Cup winning goaltender, Martin Brodeur, November 13th against the Pittsburgh Penguins (5-2 W), following his induction into the Hockey Hall of Fame on Monday, Nov. 12 in Toronto.

 

Clad in his recently-received Hockey Hall of Fame jacket, Brodeur participated in a ceremonial puck drop prior to the game. Brodeur answered fan-submitted questions during a live, in-arena interview with NHL Network Host E.J. Hradek during the game’s second intermission.

   

Brodeur, 46, played 22 years in the National Hockey League, 21 with New Jersey. He anchored all three of the Devils’ Stanley Cup Championships, leading them to the top of the league in 1995, 2000 and 2003. He backstopped the team to five Eastern Conference titles, and a total of 17 playoff appearances. In 205 career playoff games, Brodeur went 113-91 with a 2.02 GAA and .919 save percentage, and posted 24 shutouts.

 

Brodeur’s name is etched throughout the NHL’s record books and he currently sits atop numerous categories, including regular-season wins (691), single-season wins (48, ’06-’07), overtime wins (69), games played (1,266), games played with a single team (1,260), regular season shutouts (125), playoff shutouts (24), minutes played (74,083), 40-win seasons (8), 30-win seasons (13), shutouts in a playoff campaign (7, ’03) and shutouts in a Stanley Cup final (tie: 3, ’03). He is the youngest goalie to reach 300, 400 and 500 career wins and is the only goalie to reach 600 career wins.

 

 

LAUREN BOYLE: HOCKEY FIGHTS CANCER AMBASSADOR

New this season, Lauren Boyle – wife of New Jersey Devils forward Brian Boyle – has been named an official Hockey Fights Cancer ambassador. The trials of cancer are all too familiar for Lauren who has been a major support system for her husband. Brian was diagnosed in September 2017 with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, a type of bone marrow cancer. NHL.com will publish special columns by Lauren this month detailing her personal experience, as well as an interview with her and last year’s ambassador Nicholle Anderson, cancer survivor and wife of Ottawa Senators goaltender Craig Anderson.

HALL’IN IN THE POINTS

Taylor Hall’s nine game point-streak was snapped on Nov. 3rd vs. the New York Islanders (Oct. 11- Nov. 1; 2G-11A-13PTS) and has points in 13 of 21 games this season. Hall leads the Devils with 14 assists and is one point behind of Kyle Palmieri for the team lead (20).

 

In the 2017-18 regular season, Hall had a remarkable 26 game point streak, notching 18 goals and 39 points during the run. Hall was the eighth different player in NHL history to record at least one point in 26+ consecutive appearances.

 

PALMIERI’S POINTS

Kyle Palmieri tallied two goals, making him the first player in Devils franchise history to record two goals in each of the team’s first two games of the season (credit John Burd, NHL statistician). Additionally, this is the first time in the Montvale, NJ natives career that Palmieri had multiple goals in back-to-back games played.

 

With his two-goal performance on October 14 vs San Jose, Palmieri has officially put up the most goals and point by any player in New Jersey franchise history through the first three games of a season.

 

HALL’S GOT HART

 

On June 20, Taylor Hall was awarded the Hart Memorial Trophy, which is awarded annually to the “player judged most valuable to his team” in the National Hockey League. Hall is the first Devil to win the prestigious award.

 

In 2017-18, Hall set new career highs in goals (39), assists (54) and points (93) through 75 games played this season. In the 2018 calendar year, Hall recorded points in 36 of 39 games played, registering 57PTS (27G-30A).

 

Hall was also the first Devils player to reach the 90-point mark (39G-54A-93PTS) in a season since Zach Parise (45G-49A-94PTS) in 2008-09.

 

Additionally, Hall (93) posted a 41-point lead over Nico Hischier (52), which is the largest margin between the top two point producers on the Devils since the 2008-09 season (Z. Parise, 94 – P. Elias, 78 = 16 PT difference).

 

To add to the MVP’s incredible season, the Calgary, Alb. native recorded the longest point streak in the NHL last season and set the Devils franchise record (P. Elias, 1999-00; B. Gionta, 2005-06; 15 each). He registered at least one point in 26 straight appearances (18G-20A-38PTS) dating back to Jan. 2 at STL.

 

During that 26-game span, he missed three games, Jan. 22-25, due to an injury (right hand/thumb).

 

Halls’ consecutive point-streak was snapped at 19 games on Mar. 8 vs. the Winnipeg Jets (Jan. 30-Mar. 6, 13G-13A-26PTS).

 

MASTERTON TROPHY WINNER

On that same night, Brian Boyle was awarded the Bill Masterton Trophy which is given annually to the National Hockey League player who best exemplifies the qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship, and dedication to ice hockey. Boyle is the second Devil to win the admirable award.

 

Boyle was diagnosed with Chronic Myelogenous Lukemia (CML), a form of bone marrow cancer, at the beginning of last years training camp. Boyle started treatment immediately, and returned to the team to face-off against the Edmonton Oilers on November 3. On October 24, 2018 Boyle announced that his cancer was in full remission.

 

NEW FACES BEHIND THE BENCH

The Devils brought in two new assistant coaches this past off-season after Geoff Ward (Associate Coach, CGY), and Ryan Clowe (Head Coach, Newfoundland – ECHL) left the team after the ECQF loss to TB.

 

Rick Kowalsky completed his eighth season as head coach of the AHL Devils (Albany, Binghamton) at the end of the 2017-18 season. He led the franchise to back-to-back playoff berths in 2015-16 and 2016-17. In 2015-16, the club had its most successful season to date, with 46 wins and 102 points, earning him the AHL Coach of the Year Award. Over his AHL coaching career, he has a record of 281 wins, 249 losses and 82 overtime/shootout losses in 612 games.

 

Mike Grier played 1,060 NHL games as a right wing over 14 seasons with Edmonton (1996-97 to 2001-02), Washington (2002-03 to 2003-04), Buffalo (2003-04 to 2005-06 & 2009-10 to 2010-11) and San Jose (2006-07 to 2008-09). He set career highs across the board in 1998-99 with Edmonton when he scored 20 goals, 24 assists and 44 points. In 101 Stanley Cup Playoff games, Grier tallied 14 goals and 14 assists for 28 points and 72 penalty minutes. He made the playoffs in 11 of his 14 seasons in the League. Grier officially retired on December 1, 2011. The 6-1, 225lb. forward played three seasons of collegiate hockey at Boston University, where he was teammates with Hynes.

 

For the past four seasons, Grier served as a Pro Scout with the Chicago Blackhawks. He also served as an assistant coach for St. Sebastian’s High School in Needham, MA, where he played his scholastic hockey, and coached the Boston Junior Terriers.

 

 

NO SWEAT

The Devils are 26-9-12 in one-goal game and are undefeated in regulation, 38-0-3, when leading after two periods. Since 2016-17, the Devils are 57-0-14 when leading after 40 minutes of play.

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